Exciting Renovations coming to Clement Park

History

The site now known as Clement Park was part of the Grant Family Ranch and was purchased from the Grant Family by Jefferson County Open Space for use as a park.  In 1987, Jefferson County Open Space developed Clement Park with funds from the county-wide Open Space Tax and in 1989, the park was leased to Foothills Park & Recreation District for management purposes.

Aging Infastructure

Why is Foothills working on repairs to Clement Park?

  • Since taking over management of Clement Park in 1989, the park has grow in popularity and has become a heavily used facility for many community events, sporting events, passive and active activities and hosts 800,000+ visitors each year. As a result, over the 29 years of use, the park has been ‘loved to death’ and is showing its age throughout the facility.
  • Recognizing aging and deterioration, Foothills received a planning grant from Jefferson County Open Space in 2013 to work on a Redevelopment Master Plan. Throughout 2013, Foothills executed several community engagement activities and created ideas for renovation of the park.

View the Clement Park Redevelopment Master Plan

Funding

Since the Clement Park Redevelopment Master Plan was adopted by the Foothills Board of Directors in late 2013, Foothills staff worked diligently to identify funding sources to address some of the elements outlined in the plan. Foothills has secured $8,707,300 for projects in the park.

How is this being funded?

  • $4,000,000 through grant processes with Jefferson County Open Space
  • $1,000,000 from District reserves generated from the sale of vacant land
  • $3,000,000 from the refinancing of District debt
  • $700,000 though Great Outdoors Colorado (GOCO) grant, specifically to rebuild the interactive water feature and build an inclusive playground
  • $5,000 from South Jeffco Sports Association
  • $2,300 from Foothills Foundation

Coming in 2018 and beyond

  • Redevelop the amphitheater and upper promenade area including new irrigation, amphitheater enhancements, and sidewalk improvements.
  • Improving water quality in the lake, addressing deteriorating fishing piers and shoreline improvements.
  • Rebuilding the central playground to be a destination for children of all abilities to play.
  • Install new, energy efficient ballfield lighting.

Work will commence in late August through spring 2019.  View the overview of projects and impacts to the community.

Completed in 2017

RESTROOMS

  • Restore and improve the restroom buildings on the east and west side of the park.
  • Rebuild the restroom building at the ballfield complex.

LIGHTING

  • Install new energy efficient lighting for security lights, parking lot lights and pathway lights for east side of the park

FIELD 5

  • Rebuild and install new irrigation on Field 5 multipurpose field. This field, located parallel to Pierce St.

WATER FEATURE

  • Built a new interactive water fountain featuring several Colorado elements like: boulders, water curtains, creek-like waterway
  • New shelters were installed near the water feature that will be available for rentals – a perfect place to host a birthday party or get-together.
  • A small concession stand will service this site with drinks, food and general necessities.

BALLFIELD PLAZA

  • Rebuild the concession/restroom building and plaza in the center of the softball/baseball fields.
  • Added a small playground in the area.
  • Added additional shade structures to protect from the elements.

Completed in 2016

  • Replaced failing irrigation pump station, water intake pipe and irrigation system on sports fields – all were original to the park.
    • Why was irrigation only updated on sports fields?  We care for the overall look and health of the entire park. However, we felt it was best to protect revenue streams first. With limited funds to update the entire park’s irrigation, the District needed to prioritize the areas that would be covered by a new irrigation system. Our sports fields bring in revenues that although don’t fully pay park expenses, do help diminish the overall financial loss in the parks budget.

Frequently Asked Questions

Why were these specific projects picked?

  • Preserve revenue streams
  • Safety
  • Enhance the experience of a wide range of visitors
  • Improve efficiencies for maintenance and cost savings

Did Foothills pass a mill levy to execute all this work?

No.  Had the 2014 mill levy election passed, the intention was to dedicate some of the funds toward Clement Park Redevelopment as outlined in the Master Plan.  The Clement Park Redevelopment Master Plan was completed in 2013 and estimated $24 million in repairs, improvements and redevelopment.  Since the 2014 mill levy was unsuccessful, the District was able to secure close to $9 million to address the areas that needed the most attention and/or specific types of projects that we could obtain specialized grants.  Funds for Clement Park Redevelopment have come from other sources, see the next Q&A for specifics.

A mill levy increase was passed by voters in 2017, but those funds are NOT being utilized on Clement Park Renovations.  Instead, those funds are being spent to improve many community and neighborhood parks throughout the District and to make needed repairs and improvements in recreation facilities.

Where are the funds coming from for these park projects?

Since the Clement Park Redevelopment Master Plan was adopted by the Foothills Board of Directors in late 2013, Foothills staff worked diligently to identify funding sources to address some of the elements outlined in the plan.

  • $4,000,000 through grant processes with Jefferson County Open Space
  • $1,000,000 from District reserves generated from the sale of vacant land
  • $3,000,000 from the refinancing of District debt
  • $700,000 though Great Outdoors Colorado (GOCO) grant, specifically to rebuild the interactive water feature and build an inclusive playground
  • $5,000 from South Jeffco Sports Association
  • $2,300 from Foothills Foundation

Why do certain areas of the park have noticeably dead grass?

If you notice an area that has dead grass, it is likely that the area in question will be part of a future update and/or construction. We didn’t want to put irrigation in areas we knew would be disturbed again for a future phase and it’s likely we will address or alter irrigation in those areas at that time.

Who was Robert F. Clement?

Robert F. Clement (1917-1981) moved to Jefferson County from his native Oklahoma in 1951. He was a successful home builder in Jefferson County for over 20 years. Commissioner Clement spearheaded the County’s acquisition of the Hiwan Homestead Museum, actively promoted the preservation of Jefferson County’s history, and was a strong advocate of the Open Space program. He served as District 2 Commissioner from 1973-1981.  He was named to the Jefferson County Historical Commission’s Hall of Fame in 1979, and Clement Park is named for him. Prior to his election as Commissioner, Clement was active in the incorporation of the City of Lakewood, served on its first City Council and as Mayor Pro Tem, and was chairman of the Alameda Water and Sanitation District.  Source: Jefferson County, Colorado history archives